Fun Serendipity

Today I was doing some research on my AncestryDNA matches and I was following a connection from the Cloud side of the family (my paternal grandmother’s maternal side). My 3rd great grandparents, William M. Cloud & Elizabeth Betsy Johnston, had a son Huey C. Cloud who is my 2nd great grandfather and his brother’s line was showing a 4th cousin DNA match to me. Newton Cloud had a daughter Delilia (Delilah) Leila Cloud and she had a daughter Bettie (Betty) Lee Meadows and she had a son but his name isn’t known because it is set to Private. This son had a daughter that is showing as my 4th cousin. So I was looking at Bettie (Betty) Lee Meadows on the 1930 Census and noticed the sheet was only partially filled in. I never saw that before so I looked at the entry written in the blank space and it said: “Here ends the Enumeration District 35-9 Richard N. Terral Enumerator.”  Richard N. Terral is my 2nd great grandfather from the opposite side of the family (my paternal grandfather’s paternal side).  I didn’t know he worked as an enumerator and it is always fun to stumble across the family that I wasn’t even researching at the time.

There are two Richard N. Terrals in my family tree so I did some math. Richard Nathan Terral, my 2nd great grandfather, was about 59 while Richard Nell Terral, his grandson, was only 12 at the time.

Census Enumerator 8 Apr 1930 to 16 Apr 1930 (Enumerator # 3601?). Enumeration District No. 35-9, Supervisor’s District 4, Sheet 1A to 7A.

Census where Richard N Terral was enumerator

My 2nd Great Grandmother killed in murder-suicide

Today I received some photos from a cousin I recently found. Her name is Rachel and she is granddaughter to my grandmother’s sister – Trudie Hanes Land. She sent me 4 photos and they had so much information!  She had a written account from Trudie’s sister, Viola “Billie” Hanes Moore .  I couldn’t read the top portion very well but the rest says:

Daddy is Alvin Hanes in this following. His father came from Texas, Ranch 101 (?). John Hanes Daddy’s father first came to La when they drove a herd of wild mustangs to Sicley Island and homesteaded. He married Sofronia Valentine. She was born and reared in Catahoula Parish. John Hanes was killed by gangsters when daddy (Alvin Hanes) was 3 yrs old. Viena was older than Daddy. She died before Daddy and Moma (Emmie Cloud) were married. She died in childbirth. She was married to William Bohannan. The child, name was Vinnie. Grandmother kept her. Daddy’s mother and children moved to Galveston Texas 1896. Went to grandmother’s brother. They worked in Cathm (?) Mill and came back to Grant Parish. Daddy (Alvin Hanes) lived in Grant Parish and married Moma. Trudie was 3yrs old when they moved to Goldonna in 1915.

Written history from Billie Hanes

One of the other pictures was of The Colfax Chronicle from Saturday Dec 5, 1914. There is an article in the 5th column about a murder/suicide in Dry Prong, LA.  The Mrs. James Milstead in the article is aka Sofronia Valentine Hanes Milstead, my 2nd great grandmother.  James Milstead was her 2nd husband.  The text of the article is:

Murder and Suicide at Dry Prong. The details of a domestic tragedy at Dry Prong, in Grant parish, relate the fatal wounding of Mrs. James Milstead by her husband who afterward committed suicide by shooting himself in the heart. Both Milstead and his wife had been married previous to their own marriage. It appears that the couple had separated and Mrs. Milstead went to Jena to live. On Sunday, Nov. 2, she came to Dry Prong on the afternoon train, to the home of her daughter, where her grandchild lay dead. Soon after she arrived Milstead appeared and demanded that she return home with him. This she refused to do, saying that she had had all the trouble with him that she would submit to, and Milstead immediately began shooting. After shooting his wife twice and believing he had killed her, Milstead then shot and killed himself. Mrs. Milstead was taken to the Alexandria sanitarium Monday morning. She suffered greatly from her wounds, and died late Tuesday afternoon. Her remains were taken to Jena by her son, Mr. W. T. Hyynes, for burial at her old home.

Sophronia Valentine Hanes Milstead Colfax Chronicle murder suicide dec 5 1914 - Copy

Her grave along with her parents are in a cemetery before you get to Jena off of Hwy 8. Find-a-grave indicates it is called Belah Cemetery in Trout, LaSalle Parish, Louisiana.

Sofronia Hanes Valentine headstone

This is James Milstead’s death certificate.  His father is listed as SE Milstead which is different than what came up through family trees on ancestry.com.  I may research this some more in the future but he isn’t a blood relative so I may not.

James Milstead Death Certificate

I am so thankful to Rachel for sending me all of this information!!

Family Collage

My Aunt Amanda put together this collage back in 1999 and gave a print to all her siblings.  It recently resurfaced when my Aunt Sandy posted it on facebook so I decided to label it for future family historians.  I sat down with my mom, Daisy, and she told me who was who then Amanda filled in the gaps.    I enjoyed hearing the stories including how my grandmother, Pauline Darling Gove came to be wearing her husband’s uniform.  Legend has it he bet her she couldn’t fit into his dress whites and you can tell by her smile in the picture that she was happy to prove him wrong.  Amanda put the picture of Pauline’s mother Nellie May Whittier beside the uniform picture because they had similar poses.  Nellie died when Pauline was a child so it is cool to see them side by side like that.  There is a mystery regarding who the two woman and the man are in the picture with Nellie but Amanda thinks one of them is her sister.  If anyone knows, please let me know.

Family CollageLabelled

Newell F. Hill Civil War Union soldier

This information obtained from Ancestry.com and covers the 6th Infantry Regiment New Hampshire.  My 3rd great grandfather, Newell F. Hill, served in the Civil War in this regiment from 1861 to 1865.   He is my 3rd great grandfather through my mother’s side of the family – me, my mother, her father, his mother (Grace Belle Silloway), her mother (Ella Belle Hill), her father (Newell F. Hill).

When reading the description of the regiments action during the war, I noticed some names I recognized such as Antietam and Bull Run.  They were at the 2nd Bull Run and 210 of their soldiers were either killed, wounded or missing.  “The regiment during its term of service served in seventeen different states; meeting all the requisitions of duty, however onerous or perilous, with cheerful and ready efficiency. While it is not asserted that the Sixth was the best regiment sent out from New Hampshire, the claim may be made, and can be maintained, that it was equal to the best. Its record has added a brilliant chapter to the history of New Hampshire’s always glorious achievements in war.”

Other links:  http://www.newmarketnhhistoricalsociety.org/military/civil-war/6th-infantry-history-an-dassaigned-officers/

“Regiment: 6th Infantry Regiment New Hampshire
Date of Organization: 27 Nov 1861
Muster Date: 17 Jul 1865
Regiment State: New Hampshire
Regiment Type: Infantry
Regiment Number: 6th
Officers Killed or Mortally Wounded: 10
Officers Died of Disease or Accident: 3
Enlisted Killed or Mortally Wounded: 177
Enlisted Died of Disease or Accident: 228
Battles: Fought on 15 Jan 1862.
Fought on 10 Apr 1862 at Roanoke Island, NC.
Fought on 19 Apr 1862 at Camden, NC.
Fought on 21 Jul 1862 at New Berne, NC.
Fought on 29 Aug 1862 at 2nd Bull Run, VA.
Fought on 30 Aug 1862 at 2nd Bull Run, VA.
Fought on 1 Sep 1862 at Chantilly, VA.
Fought on 15 Sep 1862.
Fought on 17 Sep 1862 at Antietam, MD.
Fought on 15 Nov 1862 at White Sulphur Springs, VA.
Fought on 13 Dec 1862 at Fredericksburg, VA.
Fought on 12 Jan 1864 at Covington, KY.
Fought on 16 Jan 1864.
Fought on 8 Apr 1864.
Fought on 6 May 1864 at Wilderness, VA.
Fought on 9 May 1864 at Spotsylvania Court House, VA.
Fought on 10 May 1864 at Spotsylvania Court House, VA.
Fought on 11 May 1864 at Spotsylvania Court House, VA.
Fought on 12 May 1864 at Spotsylvania Court House, VA.
Fought on 13 May 1864 at Spotsylvania Court House, VA.
Fought on 15 May 1864 at Spotsylvania Court House, VA.
Fought on 16 May 1864 at Spotsylvania Court House, VA.
Fought on 18 May 1864 at Spotsylvania Court House, VA.
Fought on 22 May 1864.
Fought on 24 May 1864 at North Anna River, VA.
Fought on 26 May 1864 at North Anna River, VA.
Fought on 28 May 1864 at Totopotomoy Creek, VA.
Fought on 29 May 1864.
Fought on 31 May 1864 at Totopotomoy Creek, VA.
Fought on 3 Jun 1864 at Bethesda Church, VA.
Fought on 5 Jun 1864 at Cold Harbor, VA.
Fought on 7 Jun 1864 at Cold Harbor, VA.
Fought on 8 Jun 1864 at Cold Harbor, VA.
Fought on 9 Jun 1864 at Cold Harbor, VA.
Fought on 16 Jun 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 17 Jun 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 18 Jun 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 19 Jun 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 20 Jun 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 21 Jun 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 22 Jun 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 23 Jun 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 24 Jun 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 25 Jun 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 26 Jun 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 26 Jun 1864.
Fought on 27 Jun 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 28 Jun 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 2 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 3 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 4 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 5 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 6 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 7 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 8 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 10 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 11 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 12 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 14 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 15 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 16 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 17 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 18 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 19 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 20 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 21 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 22 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 24 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 25 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 26 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 27 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 28 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 30 Jul 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 10 Aug 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 18 Aug 1864 at Petersburg, VA.
Fought on 22 Aug 1864 at Weldon Railroad, VA.
Fought on 30 Sep 1864 at Poplar Springs Church, VA.
Fought on 1 Oct 1864 at Poplar Springs Church, VA.
Fought on 6 Feb 1865.
Fought on 2 Apr 1865 at Petersburg, VA.
Regiment History: SIXTH REGIMENT
NEW HAMPSHIRE VOLUNTEER INFANTRY.
( THREE YEARS )
By LYMAN JACKMAN, late Captain Sixth Regiment New
Hampshire Volunteer Infantry,.and Historian of Regiment.
THE Sixth Regiment was organized at Keene, in November,
1861, the men coming from all parts of the State. The
regiment camped on the Cheshire Fair Ground, about a mile and
a half out from the city, the camp being called “Camp Brooks.”
Company B was the first on the ground, reporting November 9.
The men were mustered in November 27 to 30, the regimental
organization being completed on the 30th.
On the 25th of December the regiment left Keene, and
proceeded via Worcester, Norwich, and New York, to Washington,
where it arrived at 4 P. M., on the 28th, and was assigned to
Casey’s Provisional Brigade, in which it remained until
January 6, 1862, being camped at Bladensburg, Md.
On the 6th of January the regiment started for Annapolis,
Md., to join Burnside’s expedition to North Carolina.
Arriving at Annapolis on the evening of the 7th, the regiment
the next day went on board the steamer “Louisiana” and the
ship “Martha Greenwood,” and arrived at Fort Monroe on the
evening of the 10th. Here the whole regiment was crowded
onto the “Louisiana,” and on the 11th started for Hatteras
Inlet, arriving there about 5 P. M., the next day, after
encountering a terrible storm on the way. The Sixth landed on
the 17th and camped at “Camp Wool” on Hatteras Island. The
camp being very unhealthy, the regiment, on the 24th, moved
about two miles to ” Camp Winfield Scott,” where it remained
until the 24th of February. On the 25th it embarked on the
steamer ” Northerner,” and landed on Roanoke Island March 2,
being assigned, on the 6th, to the Fourth Brigade, Department
of North Carolina.
On the 8th of March six companies under Lieutenant Colonel
Griffin, joined an expedition to Columbia, N. C., in search of
a rebel regiment, said to be recruiting at that place; but the
expedition returned without finding the enemy. On the night
of April 7 Lieutenant Colonel Griffin, with four companies of
the Sixth and two of the Ninth New York went to Elizabeth
City, N. C., and broke up a rebel camp. On the 19th of April,
General Reno, with four regiments and a battery, moved on
Camden, N. C., and met the enemy about 3 o’clock in the
afternoon, and a sharp fight ensued. The Sixth, by its
handsome behavior here, won complimentary notice in orders.
On the 18th of June the regiment left Roanoke Island, and
reached New Berne, N. C., the next day. During this month the
Sixth was assigned to the First Brigade, First Division,
Department of North Carolina.
On the 1st of July the Sixth embarked to join McClellan in
Virginia; but it having been reported that Richmond had been
captured, the regiment returned and landed at New Berne,
July 5, but re-embarked the next day, and on the 10th landed
at Newport News. The regiment was assigned on the 22d to the
First Brigade, Second Division, Ninth Army Corps. On the 2d
of August the regiment went on board transports, reached Aquia
creek on the 4th, landed and proceeded by rail to Falmouth,
Va., where it arrived late that night, and camped opposite
Fredericksburg. August 12 the regiment left camp and marched
to join Pope’s army, which was found near Culpeper, Va.
At Bull Run on the afternoon of the 28th the First Brigade
was ordered to attack the enemy, who ,were posted in the
woods. The Sixth with the Second Maryland on its right, made
a gallant attack ; but the Forty-Eighth Pennsylvania, on its
left, fell behind, and the Sixth being exposed to a murderous
fire on its left flank, was compelled to fall back. This
battle was the most disastrous to the regiment of any in which
it participated, two hundred and ten being killed, wounded, or
missing out of four hundred and fifty officers and men who
went into the fight. On the next day the Sixth with its
brigade acted as a support to the Second Brigade of the Second
Division of the corps. The night of the 30th the Ninth Corps
covered the retreat of Pope’s army. About 6 P. M., September
1, the enemy attacked the corps near Chantilly, Va., and the
Sixth being brought into the fight, was engaged until dark,
when the enemy withdrew.
The army then fell back to the defences of Washington; and
here the Sixth remained until the 7th of September, when, with
its corps, it moved; and passing through Frederick. Md., was
at South Mountain on the 14th, being used with its division as
a support. At Antietam on the 17th. the Sixth was again
engaged, taking part in a charge made to take the “stone
bridge” (afterwards known as “Burnside’s bridge”), on
Antietam creek.
A few days later the regiment marched to Pleasant Valley,
Md., remained until October 27, when the army left Pleasant
Valley, crossed the Potomac by pontoon bridges at Berlin, and
took up a line of march along the valley east of the Blue
Ridge, with Richmond for its objective point. The regiment
was now, with its division, in the advance of the army ; and
on the 14th of November, being a part of the advance picket
line, skirmished at Amissville. At Warrenton (or White
Sulphur) Springs, November 15th, the regiment was lightly
engaged.
On the 19th of November the regiment arrived at Falmouth
in front of Fredericksburg, and camped north of the Phillips
house until December 12, when it marched into Fredericksburg.
At about 1 P. M., the next day, the Sixth, with its brigade,
advanced to assault the enemy’s works on Marye’s Heights, and
was engaged until dark. On the 15th it returned to its former
camp-ground at Falmouth, and remained until the 10th of
February, 1863 when it was sent to Newport News.
Orders were received on the 20th of March to break camp
and take transports to Baltimore, and from thence to proceed
by rail to Cincinnati. The Ninth Army Corps was ordered to
report to General Burnside, who had been transferred to the
Department of the Ohio. As the central and southern portions
of Kentucky were being plundered by the rebels, General
Burnside decided early in April to send the Ninth Corps into
that State. Accordingly the Sixth proceeded to Lexington,
Ky., and from thence to Winchester, on the 8th of April; and
leaving Winchester on the 16th, arrived at Richmond (Ky.), on
the 18th. The regiment then proceeded to Paint Lick creek on
the 3d of May, and to Lancaster on the 10th. Remaining there
until the 23d, when it advanced to Crab Orchard, with a view
to joining in the movement upon East Tennessee, then
contemplated by General Burnside. Orders for the movement
were countermanded, however, and on the 4th of June the
regiment left Crab Orchard; and at evening on the 6th, reached
Cincinnati, where the night was spent. The next morning the
regiment left Cincinnati, and reached Cairo on the 8th, went
on board the steamer “General Anderson” the next day, and
passed down the Mississippi river to join General Grant in his
operations against Vicksburg.
On the 13th of June the fleet reached Milliken’s Bend, and
on the 14th the Sixth disembarked near the canal dug by
General Williams to turn the river so that the Union boats
might pass Vicksburg unmolested. On the 15th the regiment
marched southwest to a point on the river about ten miles
below Vicksburg, returning the same day; and on the morning of
the 16th, went up the Yazoo river to Haynes’ Bluff, and camped
at Milldale, about a mile distant. Here the regiment remained
until the 22d, when it marched eastward, and on the 25th came
upon some of the enemy’s outposts near the Big Black river.
After waiting here a few days the movement was continued July
1st to Oak Ridge. Vicksburg surrendered on the 4th, and
the Sixth immediately started with the army in pursuit of the
enemy under General Johnston. The rebels made a stand at
Jackson, Miss., and here the Sixth was engaged from the 10th
to the 17th, when it was discovered that Johnston had
evacuated the city. On the 20th the army began its return
march, and three days afterward the Sixth reached its old camp
at Milldale. Here the regiment remained until August 8, when
it embarked and made its way up the river to Cairo and thence
by rail to Cincinnati, which was reached on the 20th. On the
23d the Sixth proceeded by rail to Nicholasville, and camped a
few miles from the village near Camp Nelson, Ky.
On the 9th of September the Sixth was sent to Frankfort to
do provost duty. Leaving Frankfort the 24th, the regiment
reached Russellville the next day, where it remained until the
26th of October; then it left for Camp Nelson to perform
provost duty, and arrived there the next day. While here many
of the men re-enlisted, and on January 16, 1864, the re-
enlisted men left for New Hampshire to spend the furlough of
thirty days granted by terms of re-enlistment. They were
afterwards re-furloughed, and did not leave the State until
the 18th of March, when they proceeded to Annapolis, Md., to
join the Ninth Corps, then re-assembling at that place. The
remainder of the regiment joined, and -the Sixth was assigned
to the Second Brigade, Second Division, Ninth Army Corps,
April 20. On the 23d of April the regiment marched with its
corps to join the Army of the Potomac, reaching it in time to
take part in the battle of the Wilderness on the 6th of May,
where, with the Second Brigade, it made an heroic charge,
capturing a large number of prisoners. From the 8th to the
20th, the Sixth was at Spottsylvania, being severely engaged
on the 12th and 18th. Starting on the 21st, the regiment
pushed on to the North Anna river, where it was in the reserve
from the 23d to the 25th, and was in the front line on the
26th, when Lieutenant-Colonel Pearson was killed. The army
moved on the night of the 26th, towards Totopotomoy creek,
where the Sixth was engaged on the 30th and 31st.
June 2 and 3 the regiment was engaged near Bethesda
Church, and from the 4th to the 12th, was under fire at Cold
Harbor. On the night of the 12th the army withdrew, and at
Noon of the 16th the Ninth Corps arrived in front of
Petersburg. Here the regiment was constantly under fire until
the 20th of August, taking part in the assault following the
explosion of the “Mine” on the 30th of July. August 20 the
corps withdrew and moved to the Weldon Railroad. Here on the
20th and 21st, the Sixth assisted in repelling two desperate
attacks made by the rebels. A new line of intrenchments was
thrown up, connecting with those formerly held, and the
regiment remained here under fire until September 30.
On the 30th of September and the day following, the Sixth
was engaged near Poplar Springs Church, about one hundred and
twenty-five officers and men being killed, wounded, or
captured. Works were thrown up, and the regiment remained
here until early in December, participating without loss in
the engagement at Hatcher’s Run, on the 27th of October.
Early in December the corps returned to its original
position in front of Petersburg, the Sixth lying in rear of
Fort Alexander Hays until April 1, 1865. While here the
regiment took part in a reconnoissance to Nottoway Court
House, December 10,11, and 12,1864. On the night of April 1,
1865, the Sixth, with its brigade, made a successful attack on
the enemy’s works to the left of Fort Davis, and on the
morning of the 2d participated in a second successful attack
near Fort Sedgwick.
From Petersburg the regiment marched in pursuit of Lee’s
army, arriving at Burkeville on the 9th of April. On the 20th
the regiment marched for City Point, and leaving there on the
26th, embarked on the steamer “D. R. Martin.” Alexandria was
reached the next day, where the regiment remained in camp
until mustered out on the 17th of July. On the 18th of July
the regiment left Alexandria, and proceeded by rail to New
York, thence by boat to Norwich, and arrived at Concord,
July 23.
The regiment during its term of service served in
seventeen different states; meeting all the requisitions of
duty, however onerous or perilous, with cheerful and ready
efficiency. While it is not asserted that the Sixth was the
best regiment sent out from New Hampshire, the claim may be
made, and can be maintained, that it was equal to the best.
Its record has added a brilliant chapter to the history of New
Hampshire’s always glorious achievements in war.
The Sixth New Hampshire Volunteers was attached to General
Casey’s Provisional Brigade, near Washington, D. C., December
28, 1861; General Burnside’s Expedition to North Carolina,
January 6, 1862; Fourth Brigade, Department of North Carolina,
March 6, 1862; First Brigade, First Division, Department of
North Carolina, June, 1862; First Brigade, Second Division,
Ninth Army Corps, July 22, 1862; District of Kentucky,
Department of Ohio, September 9, 1863; on Veteran Furlough,
January 16, 1864; in Ninth Army Corps, unassigned, March,
1864; Second Brigade, Second Division, Ninth Army Corps, April
20, 1864.
E N G A G E M E N T S .
Camden, N.C. Apr. 19, 1862
Bull Run, Va. Aug. 29, 30, 1862
Chantilly, Va. Sept. 1, 1862
South Mountain, Md. Sept. 14, 1862
Antietam, Md. Sept. 17, 1862
White Sulphur Springs, Va. Nov. 15, 1862
Fredericksburg, Va. Dec. 13, 1862
Siege of Vicksburg, Miss. June 14 to July 4, 1863
Jackson, Miss. July 10-16, 1863
Wilderness, Va. May 6, 1864
Spottsylvania, Va. May 8-20, 1864
North Anna River, Va. May 23-26, 1864
Totopotomoy, Va. May 30,31, 1864
Bethesda Church, Va. June 2,3, 1864
Cold Harbor, Va. June 4-12, 1864
Siege of Petersburg, Va., June 16, 1864 to Apr 3, 1865
Mine Explosion, Petersburg, Va.
(assault) July 30, 1864
Weldon Railroad, Va. Aug. 20-22, 1864
Poplar Springs Church, Va. Sept. 30, Oct. 1, 1864
Hatcher’s Run, Va. Oct. 27, 1864
Petersburg, Va. Apr. 1, 2, 1865
Source: New Hampshire Soldiers & Sailors War of the Rebellion, Ayling
U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles
Source Information

Historical Data Systems, comp. American Civil War Regiments [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999.

Original data: Data compiled by Historical Data Systems of Kingston, MA from the following list of works. Copyright 1997-2000
Historical Data Systems, Inc.
PO Box 35
Duxbury, MA 023.

Description

This database contains regiment records from the American Civil War in the United States.”

Newell F. Hill Military History Civil War 1861 - 1865 US National Homes for Disabled Volunteer Veterans

Newell F. Hill Indexes to the Carded Records of Soldiers Who Served in Volunteer Organizations During the Civil War, compiled 1899 - 1927, documenting the period 1861 - 1866

Hill, Newell F Organization Index to Pension Files of Veterans Who Served Between 1861 and 1900, compiled 1949 - 1949, documenting the period 1861 - 1942

Newell F. Hill Civil War Pension documents 1

General Ambrose E. Burnside (reading newspaper) with Mathew B. Brady (nearest tree) at Army of the Potomac Headquarters - Newell F. Hill served under Burnside

General Ambrose E. Burnside (reading newspaper) with Mathew B. Brady (nearest tree) at Army of the Potomac Headquarters – Newell F. Hill served under Burnside

antietam

Second_Battle_of_Bull_Run

President Lincoln with General George B. McClellan and Group of Officers - Antietam, MD, October 3, 1862 - Newell F. Hill served at Antietam, MD

President Lincoln with General George B. McClellan and Group of Officers – Antietam, MD, October 3, 1862 – Newell F. Hill served at Antietam, MD

Unexpected Connections – Fortner, Parker, Stapleton, Whatley

Earlier this week, I was researching the line for Mary Ann Olds.  She is my 3rd great grandmother on my paternal grandmother’s side of the family.  Mary Ann Olds was born around 1829 in Mississippi and died around 1900 in Catahoula Parish in Louisiana, USA.   Her mother was Ann Fortner, daughter of Bersheba Arrington and John Fortner.   While I was doing some searching online, I ran Bersheba Arrington through Google.  When the search results came up, I noticed one had the name of one of the nurses I used to work with at Mid State Home Health.  I’m just going to call her Whatley because I haven’t asked permission to use her name.  I followed the link to see why the names came up connected but it was to a forum with 500+ entries and I couldn’t find the correct thread.  So I searched the nurse’s name on Google and came up with her family tree online.  Thankfully, she had the surnames for all the people on her tree set up as links so I could skim that list to see if any matched with my people.  I found the surname Stapleton which led me to Ana J. Stapleton, the wife of Phineas Harmon Whatley.  Ana J. Stapleton is daughter of Nancy Jane Parker & John Wesley Stapleton.  Nancy Jane Parker is daughter of Ann Fortner and William Parker, Ann’s 2nd husband.  This makes Ana J. Stapleton great granddaughter to Bersheba Arrington as well as my 1st cousin 4x removed .  I was able to navigate my way through the Whatley family tree until I reached the entry for the nurse I once worked with at Mid State. Her 1st cousin 4x removed, Phineas Harmon Whatley, married my 1st cousin 4x removed, Ana J. Stapleton.  I know that was probably hard to follow but I hope it isn’t impossible.  It is so cool to learn about connections to people I have known for years and never knew there was any kind of family connection.

Over the years, people have asked if I was related to one person or another and I would always say no because I didn’t see beyond my immediate family up to 1 generation back.  I wish I had started this research when I was younger or at least before I did home health.  I may have taken care of family over the years and never knew it.  I have discovered family in LaSalle Parish in Louisiana and the home health I worked for had offices in Jena, which is a bigger town in that parish, and in Pollock, which is in Grant Parish.   I’ve found connections to Natchitoches Parish, Winn Parish, Catahoula Parish, and Grant Parish in addition to the ones I already knew about in Rapides Parish.  I’m looking forward to finding out so much more in the future.

A little bit of everybody – Cloud, Terral, Foster, Olds, John Harville

I have been researching most of the day.  Started off uploading some pictures to ancestry.com for the last few generations.  I have scanned in quite a few pics that came from my grandmother’s (Ruby Hanes Terral)  house.  I helped clean out her house when we had to sell it and I rescued the photographs so I could scan them in and share with the rest of the family.  It is nice to have a face to put with the name.  While I was uploading pics, I became distracted filling in some gaps in information on the Cloud and Terral sides.  I used the PDFs I have of the most recent generations.  I was trying to fill out all my father’s cousins so I could upload pics to theirs.

I did a little more looking on Samuel Osborne and John C. Hanes including searching at Newspapers.com and Fold3.com.  I found some people by those names but the dates and locations didn’t match up so I don’t think they were my guys.  I was pleased to find some interesting stories in the newspapers even though I don’t think they are my relatives.  Here is one about a man named Samuel Osborne:

Not relatives - Samuel C. Osborne old article

And this is a poem by a man named John C. Hanes (not a relative):

Not relatives - John C. Hanes poem

I also did some searching on those sites for John Harville because he pulls up with a Civil War service record.  I found a few different entries and it is hard to tell which is the correct John Harville.  More than likely the Confederate soldier and not the Union one because he is from Louisiana.

       I was happy to find some information on Mary Ann Olds, wife of Reuben Valentine and mother of Sophronia Valentine.  She showed up through ancestry.com as either Oles or Olds.  Looking through the census records led me to believe it should be Olds.   Her mother was listed as Ann Fortner in some places but when I worked back from Sophronia Valentine, my 2nd great grandmother it led to Mary Ann Olds.  Through census records and findagrave.com plus the names on Sophronia Valentine’s wedding certificate (I have a copy from a family member), I found names that supported Ann Foster Olds Parker Day as Mary Ann Olds mother.  Benjamin F. Parker, son of Ann Parker, was a witness at Sophronia Valentine’s wedding.  William J. Valentine, Sophronia’s brother, was also a witness.

          Now I’m questioning the man pulled up by ancestry as Mary Ann’s father because he lived in New York.  I will have to do some more digging on that line to try to support that relationship.

JC Hanes Sophronia Valentine marriage

1870 Census Valentine, Day

1860 Census Valentine, Day, Parker

1850 Census Ann Foster Parker

Ann Foster Day Olds findagrave

Mary Ann Olds headstone

John C. Hanes, Who are you??

Today, I have been working on organizing my information on my computer, my bookmarks, my scanned pictures, etc.  It was all getting out of control but it is better now.  I’ve also been doing some hit and miss, mainly miss, searching on John C. Hanes.  He is my 2nd great grandfather on my father’s mother’s side.

I have his marriage license from 1885 where he married Sophronia Valentine in Catahoula Parish but not much more than that.  I know she was remarried on the 1900 census so John might have died prior to that.  The 1890 census is not available because it was ruined in a fire & through some mismanagement of the records so that wealth of info is lost.  Such a shame!  I was trying to go around him and see if he showed up on any of his children but no luck so far.  I did find a new item for Sophronia in the 1898 Galveston City Directory.  She was listed as Mrs. JC but didn’t look like he was there.  I already had a pic of him from my father with notation on the picture that John Hanes was my great great grandfather & shot & killed. Daddy doesn’t remember writing that and he doesn’t remember what happened to John C. Hanes.  I went around and signed up for some Hanes mailing lists to see if I can discover anything through them.  Time to call it quits for the day, looking forward to more research tomorrow and hopefully a breakthrough!

EmmieCloudHanes ViolaHanesMoore AlvinHanes JohnHanes

JC Hanes Sophronia Valentine marriage

Sophronia Hanes Mrs JC 1898 Galveston Texas City Directory

Sophronia Valentine 1870 census